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Robin Babbini

Robin-Cancer-Day-Info.[8]

HONORING THE MEMORY OF ROBIN BABBINI

MAY, 1986 – JUNE, 2006

Robin Babbini was your busy teenager and honor student, engaged in numerous high school activities – co-captain of the cheerleading squad, homecoming queen and dramatic arts. Her dynamic life was turned upside down when at the age of 17 she was diagnosed with Stage 3 ovarian cancer. She had a total hysterectomy followed by chemo treatments. Amazingly, with unrivaled optimism she completed her classes, graduated high school and began her freshman year at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Six, short months later, symptoms of the cancer recurred. Following another surgery, which revealed the cancer had metastasized to several other organs. Robin began an endless round of grueling, exhausting treatments. Undeterred, she continued her studies and pledged the national sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma, where she quickly found new friendships and wondrous support. She even participated as co-captain at the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life at UCSB, where she spoke poignantly about the disease that was consuming her.

Six weeks later on June 29, 2006, Robin Babbini lost her battle with ovarian cancer. She was
20 years old!

Robin has left a remarkable legacy. The Ovarian Cancer Circle/Inspired By Robin Babbini,
is a non profit organization based in Los Angeles, founded by Robin’s mother, Paulinda
to honor Robin’s memory and help educate others about this most deadly disease.

Robin’s alma mater, Pacific Hills High School in West Hollywood has created the
“Robin Babbini Outstanding Senior Award.” The Ovarian Cancer Circle annually presents
the “Robin Babbini Community Achievement Award” to honor a member of her beloved
sorority. The UCSB French Language Department designates the annual “Robin Memorial
Award to an outstanding French 3 level student.

Most importantly, Robin has brought Ovarian Cancer to the forefront of young women’s
awareness, who now know that this insidious disease knows no age boundaries.

If there had been an early detection test, improved diagnosis and targeted treatments, maybe
Robin would be here today to tell her story herself!